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the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
>>> long road ahead. authorities in the u.s. investigate the dreamliner and find its batteries could keep it on the ground for sometime to come. u.s. transportation investigators cast doubt on a quick fix for the problems facing the dreamliner. they say regulators need to rethink their approval of batteries used in the boeing 787. a number of agencies are looking in to a string of safety incidents. deborah hershman chairs. she said a lithium ion battery sparked a fire a month ago on a japan airlines yet in boston. >> this investigation has demonstrated that a short circuit in a single cell can propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire. >> engineers packaged eight cells together in designing the battery system for the dreamliner. hersman said they did not place them far enough apart so trouble in one of them could affect the others. she said investigators have not determined why the batteries short circuited. another battery fire forced the pilot of a dreamline tore make an emergency last month in western japan. u.s. authorities grounded all 787s. officials at boe
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
by tenth of a percent. u.s. president barack obama nominee for secretary of the treasurely is asking lawmakers for bipartisan report. he said this is needed to keep the u.s. economy on the path to recovery. lew spoke to senators on wednesday. he is seeking their approval for his appoint to obama's second term cabinet. he said he's resolved to reduce the nation's huge budget deficit. he asked republicans and democrats to work together. >> we must put our nation back on a path of fiscal sustainability. we cannot allow t harmful cuts known as the sequester to go into effect. these cuts would impose inflected wounds to the recov y recovery. the strong dollar is in the best interest of proting u.s. owth. if confirmed i wldothang ta policy. >> officials in the u.s. will start talk to form a transatlantic free trade agreement. it would create a huge trade block and account for nearly all of global production. the plan was announced in a joint statement on wednesday. they have agreed to launch negotiations for a comprehensive plan. the united states will seem approval from congress while th
a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a
's ceremony unveiling a statue of civil rights pioneer rosa parks in the u.s. capitol. >> she lived a life of activism but also a life of dignity and grace. and in a single moment with the simplest of gestures she helped change america and change the world. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a hist
. >> name one person who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the u.s. senate. >>he use of intimition -- i should have used influence. >> he could not name one person publicly. this is gamesmanship of the first order. you have conversations with plenty of members of congress and they feel one way about some of the issues in the middle east, that they simply cannot move an inch on issues involving israel. >> is he in command of the issues? >> i dnot think anybody would have come off well. i think it was a halting performance by chuck hagel, and chuck hagel underline what nina said earlier, not a burbling- nimble person. not a guy that is known for sound bites, not somebody that you would go to for a quotation on deadlines. he would give the thought of context or any answer he would give -- >> god forbid. [laughter] >> more than anything else, i could not get over the badger and quality. yes or no. yes or no, senator. john mccain was looking for vindication for the surge. chuck hagel was not going to give it to him. >> john mccain is not the issue, it is chuck hagel. his problem is not some
says iran will be at the top of his agenda when u.s. president barack obama visits israel next month. >>> chinese officials have tak over management of a port in pakistan. officials from a chinese state run firm acquired the rights last month to control gwadar port in south western pakistan. it lies near the strait of hormuz. pakistani president and chinese ambassador attended a hand over ceremony in the capital. the port is strategic for chichn it imports crude oil from the north. >> it gives importance to china-pakistan relations. >> the chinese ambassador says much of china remains unstable. they must take advantage when they see openings. >> to seize opportunities. >> chise companies were recent involved in a series of port projects in myanmar. the entrance into pakistan has raised concerns in india. >>> people in many parts of china say the clouds of smog they have seen for weeks make it harder to breathe. scientists say particles in the air could damage people's health. researchers studied samples from the atmosphere over beijing and two other areas. they detected a harmful com
sharply lower after a strong rally on monday. the drop follows a slump in u.s. markets. the yen strength has been a drag on a wide range of issues. they are concerned about whether italy can consider its final reforms. the nikkei average is down 1.75%. the dollar was at a one month low and not a one month high. let's take a look at other markets in the asia pacific. south korea's kospi down a thirthird of a percent. let's see what's going in australia. it's down to 5,018. we'll see where other markets take us as they open in next hour. japan's prime minister abe has made his choice for the new bank of japan leader. looks like many leaders of the oppotion party of japan wi goalong with it. kuroda is the chief of the asian development bank. abe is planning to present his nominees to the diet for approval by the end of this week. the government needs support from opposition parties. some members have expressed concerns. they say signing off on his appointment could be construed as approving the there isn't much doubt about his ability. some say there's not much mileage in continuing its opp
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about h positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq
to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be.
, likely methods of attack on the u.s. homela. ge body of intelligence we got by capturing khalid sheikh mohammed and putting him through enhanced inter know,rogati thers been some f.b.i. officials that said we have this information, some of the information that he divulged we had from other sources. >> well, he was telling us the truth. >> rose: but if you had the information beforehand, was it necessary? >> so we should have killed khalid sheikh mohammed? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i'm a big believer in the interrogation program. the point is -- >> rose: b i mean go ahead. >> k.s.m. was more than anybody else objected to enhanced interrogation techniques and more than anybody else provided us with key pieces of intelligence that we needed in order to defend the nation against al qaeda. >> rose: define "enhanced interrogation." >> it was a specific set of techniques that were used, applied to detainees. every one of those techniques were used on our own people in training. through our seal program, the asian program. >> rose: including waterboarding? >> including waterboarding. a t ofamer
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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